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Care and Hanlding of Books

Preservation is a never ending challenge in libraries, especially in rare and special collections, archives, historical societies, and other cultural institutions. We need to think about the condition of materials before handing them to a researcher. Can we provide a surrogate or facsimile or is the original necessary for the researcher? What type of storage … Continue reading

Digital Collections

I was going to write about my experience today at the Center for Jewish History in NYC. I just wrote about the talk and experience to my Rare Book Librarianship students. Rather than repeat myself, I’ll just give you the link. http://mkahn1.blogspot.com/2012/10/digital-collections.htmlTomorrow I’m off to Columbia University. I’ll take some pictures of the Hebrew Bibles … Continue reading

Digital Collections

Today I went to the Center for Jewish History http://www.cjh.org/ for the formal launch of the digital archives of the Leo Baeck Institute. http://www.lbi.org/digibaeck/ There’s actually a video of the 2 hours of presentations. Brewster Kahle of the Internet Archive http://archive.org/ spoke about making the knowledge of the world freely accessible to everyone. Here’s his … Continue reading

Biblioclasts

Biblioclasts are a class in themselves when it comes to collectors and dealers. These are individuals who break apart books or sets of plates and sell them separately.  As we read in the article by Karen Edwards “Rip, Slash, and Tear: Can Plundering Books be a Form of Preservation?” Fine Books & Collections 5 no. … Continue reading

Fragments and miscellaneous bits in books

When we look at early printed books, we often find materials are reused inside newer books. The Harry Ransom Center has a wonderful website that provides photographs of manuscripts bound into books. http://www.facebook.com/HarryRansomCenterFragments They also have images up on Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/ransom_center_fragments/ Some of the manuscripts are identifiable, others are not. Here’s an example of a … Continue reading